Philanthropy Roundup: March 2020

Photo of book title pages,
"She Who Inspires" is a new book from UC San Diego that highlights San Diegan women who are changing the world through their philanthropy.

If you’re a philanthropist, your schedule might make it hard to keep up with the latest news, topics and emerging trends in the world of giving back.

That’s why we’re making it easier for you to stay current.

Our “Philanthropy Roundup” posts highlight stories – at the local and national level – that are valuable to our readers and will keep you up to date in the world of philanthropy. Check out the articles below.

Philanthropy Roundup

Book Recognizes San Diego’s Philanthropic Women Who are Changing the World
UCSD News
“She Who Inspires” is a new book that recognizes the rise of female philanthropists throughout the San Diego region who are challenging the conventions of what it means to transform the world. For the women spotlighted, philanthropy is about more than giving money—it is about giving time, leadership and vision.

How Philanthropy Can Create Public Systems Change
Stanford Social Innovation Review
Philanthropic investment in the public system through the social sector can enable systems change. Here is a story of how one initiative transformed access to public higher education for incarcerated and formerly incarcerated Californians.

A Lesson on Philanthropy From Martin Luther King Jr.
TIME
In the year before the March on Washington, Martin Luther King Jr. prepared a series of sermons that would become the book Strength to Love. Among the reflections in the book, he discusses the relationship between philanthropy and economic injustice. This brief article presents a new way of thinking to the reader based on Dr. King’s words.

Don’t Save Money On The Wrong Things
Forbes
All philanthropists — whether they are a foundation leader, donor, professional athlete, corporate executive — want to be good caretakers of their charitable wealth. They want assets to grow and costs to be reduced, so there’s more money to give away. The trouble is, in their altruistic effort to be frugal, they hold back on investment in important things like research, evaluation, strategy development, talent, technology and even personal learning.

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